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Species

Deinbollia Borbonica

Family: Sapindaceae
GIR: Mndalamwaka

Small tree or shrub. Cream flowers and yellow berries.

Propagate from seed.
The flowers attract hordes of insects including; moths, butterflies, bees, wasps, ants and beetles. Monkeys and birds eat the fruit. Charaxes butterflies eat the rotting fruit (needs confirming). The fruit is edible. The plant roots are medicinal.

Deinbollia hosts:

  • Egybolis vaillantina
  • Euphedra neophron
  • Euxanthe wakefieldi
  • Charaxes varanes
  • Various Lycaenid Blues which feed on the maturing
    seeds.

Dovyalis Macrocalyx

Family: Salicaceae (ex Flacourtiaceae)
GIR: Mdunga-tundu, Mdungutundu

Evergreen spiny shrub with orange fruit. Grown from seed and wildings. My hedge came from seed. The fruit is delicious and eaten by birds. Makes an excellent hedge. Grows in sun or shade. Roots and stem are used in traditional medicine.

Larvae host plant to :

  • Cymothoe herminia,
  • Phalanta phalantha (common leopard),
  • Phalanta eurytis

Zanthoxylum Chalybeum Var. Chalybeum

Family: Rutaceae
ENG: Knobwood
GIR: Mudhungu
TSW: Mjafari

Naturalised in Kenya. Spiny deciduous shrub or tree up to 12 m high- leaves have medicinal use. Has
self seeded in Kilifi. This tree is a larval host plant to Swallowtails. Leaves, shoots and fruits are used for
tea.

The bark leaves and roots are used medicinally, including as a treatment for malaria.

Possibly larval host to:

  • Papilio dardanus – African Mocker Swallowtail
  • Papilio demodocus – Citrus Swallowtail

Harrisonia Abyssinica

Family: Rutaceae
GIR: Mkindhunga

A thorny shrub or small tree.

Roots and leaves are used for traditional anti-malarial medicine. Makes a useful defensive hedge.
The fruits are edible.

This plant has self seeded and can be invasive.

Psychotria Punctata

Family: Rubiaceae
Giriama: Mboga-boga

Small shrub or tree to 3M. Coffee family.
Self seeded.

Very attractive to butterflies when in flower. Used in traditional medicine.

May be larval host to:

  • Jana eurymas – Banded monkey